Petra Kvitova Maria Sharapova of Russia (L) and Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic pose before their Ladies' final round match on Day Twelve of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on July 2, 2011 in London, England.

Kanepi vs. Radwanska:  Hailing from nearly adjacent countries, these Eastern European women could not represent more divergent attitudes to the sport.  While Mats Wilander surely would include the Estonian among the “mindless bashers” of the WTA, he could have little but praise for the crafty Pole who has won both of their previous meetings.  Just 16-16 when this tournament began, Kanepi has resurfaced impressively with victories over US Open quarterfinalist Pennetta and world #1 Wozniacki, the Tokyo defending champion.  Fitness typically has troubled a player more burly than many, but she rallied impressively from a one-set deficit against the Italian and outlasted the Dane in another extended encounter.  Better known for her physical and mental resilience is Radwanska, the author of a one-set comeback as well against Jankovic, whom she bageled in the final set.  Nevertheless, her nearly total lack of offense proved no impediment when she faced a Serb just as comfortable with counterpunching and reluctant to seize the initiative.  Since Wimbledon, Radwanska’s star has risen steadily with a title in San Diego and semifinal at the Rogers Cup.  She avenged her US Open loss to Kerber in yet another three-setter this week and has accumulated so much momentum over the last few months that only an outstanding serving and returning performance from Kanepi can stop her.  Once the rally shifts into neutral terms, the Estonian’s raw talent will struggle to overcome the Pole’s expert ball placement and point construction.

Azarenka vs. Bartoli:  Unlike the previous match, this quarterfinal features two opponents with the same set of offensively oriented goals.  In most of their previous meetings, Bartoli’s double-fisted groundstrokes have placed her at a disadvantage when she confronts Azarenka’s symmetrical baseline game.  An efficient mover who covers the court better than most aggressors, the third seed has exploited the Frenchwoman’s less assured lateral movement and sometimes forced her to take one of her hands off the racket.  On fast surfaces like grass and indoor hard courts, however, Bartoli will have as great an opportunity as she ever will to topple Vika, who will have a little less time to counter her opponent’s first strike.  Inspiring the Frenchwoman with further hope is her impressive victory over fellow double-fister Peng Shuai, one of the WTA’s most improved players in 2011.  Meanwhile, Azarenka slogged through an erratic victory over the unremarkable Klara Zakopalova during which she fell behind early in both sets.  Since both players possess outstanding power and precision on their returns, their first-serve percentages will play a vital role in the outcome.  On the other hand, Bartoli may wish to strike bold returns even on Azarenka’s first serve, normally a consistent shot but not a weapon.  By contrast, the Frenchwoman’s serve can deliver point-ending shots or double faults in equal abundance, a consequence of her idiosyncratic rhythm and motion.  Both women exited the US Open in the first week, Azarenka predictably and Bartoli unexpectedly, so both may consider this tournament an opportunity to reassert themselves after a generally uplifting summer.

Kirilenko vs. Zvonareva:  Winless in five previous clashes with her compatriot, Russia’s other Maria nevertheless has thrust Zvonareva deep into two tense encounters last year, one of which culminated in a third-set tiebreak.  The WTA’s Russians often bring out the worst in each other’s games, a pattern that should apply with no less force to the fragile Zvonareva.  Scoring consecutive victories over Slam champions Stosur and Ivanovic, Kirilenko may have benefited from the post-championship malaise of the former and a back injury to the latter, but she has developed an increasingly proficient net game in recent months that carried her to the second week of the US Open.  Less susceptible to pressure than some of her countrywomen, she saved several match points against Stosur there before winning the longest women’s tiebreak in tournament history.  Not seriously tested by either of her first two opponents, Zvonareva has dropped just three games in her last three sets while dispatching Pironkova and Benesova.  While mighty servers can rattle the second-ranked Russian, she can settle into her balanced baseline style when she faces an opponent without that level of power.  Her penetrating groundstrokes may hamper Kirilenko’s efforts to close off angles at the net or finish points, suggesting that she will need an error-prone night from Vera to advance.  In falls past, Zvonareva has enjoyed notable successes such as reaching the finals last year at the Premier Mandatory tournament in Beijing and coming within a set of the year-end championships title in 2008.  Appearing to thrive in the less intense atmosphere of these events, she can focus calmly upon playing tennis—something that she does as well as anyone in the WTA on any given day.

Sharapova vs. Kvitova:  Since their collision in the Wimbledon final, its protagonists have traced divergent routes through the summer.  As Kvitova sputtered and fizzled during early, one-sided losses in both Canada and Cincinnati, Sharapova pounded her way to the title at the latter Premier Five event.  At the US Open, though, their paths drew parallel once more in error-strewn early losses that bore scant resemblance to their mastery of the grass.  On the faster courts of fall, the first-strike tennis that they practice should reap rewards, as it has for 2009 Tokyo champion and former year-end championships titlist Sharapova.  Discomfited by Kvitova’s sliding lefty serve on grass, she may find that shot less frustrating on the somewhat higher-bouncing courts here.  Yet Sharapova also will need to avoid the double digits in double faults that she reached during her otherwise scintillating third-round, two-tiebreak victory over Julia Goerges.  At the All England Club, Kvitova struck her shots with superior depth although not closer to the lines, thus pinning her opponent behind the baseline without embracing excessive risk.  Consequently, Sharapova will seek to win the crucial battle of north-south court positioning before showcasing her more familiar ability to stretch an opponent laterally with angles.  The Czech moves slightly more effectively than her fellow Wimbledon champion and has slightly more variety in her arsenal, although she will win far fewer matches through subtlety and nuance than through the muscular imposition of her authority.  Most intriguing of the Tokyo quarterfinals, this match pits the season’s most impressive resurgence on the women’s side against its most impressive breakthrough artist.  They have met only twice in their careers, but the WTA can only hope that such intriguing intersections between stars of different generations occur more frequently in the future.  Even in the depleted significance of this setting, these matches make the fall more meaningful.

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