Victoria Azarenka - WTA Championships - Istanbul 2011 - Day Two

Azarenka (1-0) vs. Li (1-0):  Showing scant respect for her elders, the Minx from Minsk marched straight from her Luxembourg title to Istanbul and demolished Stosur for the fifth straight time.  While the Aussie suffered from a competitive hangover following her breakthrough against Sharapova, Azarenka permitted her virtually no openings as she surrendered just five points on serve until the last game of the match.  Early in what one hopes will become a week of gritty, grueling competition, the opportunity to notch a swift victory will have enhanced her already excellent hopes of advancing to the semifinals of this event for the first time.  After Sharapova’s withdrawal, Azarenka can rest confident in the knowledge that she most likely will notch a second win on Friday over Bartoli, whom she has dominated almost as relentlessly as Stosur.  She probably will advance even if she doesn’t win on Thursday, therefore, but no top-five player has reached that height by taking such things for granted.

Neither should Azarenka take a win over Li Na for granted, since the Chinese star halted her at two majors this year and has won four of their five encounters overall.  At both Melbourne and Roland Garros, Li proved both slightly more consistent in the extended exchanges from behind the baseline and slightly more adept at finishing points once she moved inside the court.  Much more impressive when returning than when serving, both women should know that breaks mean little and that almost no lead or deficit is insurmountable.  In her opening victory over Sharapova, Li illustrated that fact when she managed to win a first set that she appeared to have lost on three different occasions:  when she faced break point trailing 2-4, when Sharapova served for the set after breaking her at love, and when the Russian led 4-0 in the tiebreak.  At that last juncture, the Roland Garros champion relied upon her return to barely flick two mighty serves into play—and then watched her opponent miss a routine point-ending shot.  Although Li cannot expect such generosity when she faces Azarenka, her rhythmic style will benefit from the similarly rhythmic style across the net.  Remarkably, she could erase the disappointments of her second-half campaign by reaching the semifinals here, an objective likely accomplished with a victory on Thursday.

Wozniacki (1-1) vs. Kvitova (1-0):  Splitting three-setters in her first two matches, the world #1 must elevate her level from her first two matches in order to ensure that her last round-robin match does not become her last match of 2011.  Having spent about five hours on court against Radwanska and Zvonareva, Wozniacki cannot afford to lose any of her fabled foot speed when she confronts Kvitova.  While the allegedly sluggish surface slows the ball and produces the longer rallies that she favors, its stickiness also takes a toll upon her all-important legs.  Late in her loss to Zvonareva, Wozniacki looked weary and emotionally deflated despite staying well within range of the Russian.  Perhaps the labors of a long season, fraught with greater turbulence than the calm Dane would prefer, weighed upon her mind as the court clung to her feet.  Or perhaps the accomplishment of clinching the year-end #1 ranking for the second straight season shrank the match into insignificance from her perspective.

Only once in four attempts has Kvitova conquered Wozniacki, but that victory came in the most important of their meetings at Wimbledon last year.  When she dispatched Zvonareva in her first match, the Czech lefty penetrated the court with ease from both groundstroke wings and even added a few surprising touches of finesse.  The controlled indoor atmosphere tilts more towards her unflinching pursuit of precision than towards the style of anyone else in her group.  Not the best front-runner, however, she squandered a double-break lead in the second set against Zvonareva with bizarrely unfocused play.  Even during her sensational run at Wimbledon, Kvitova allowed more than one opponent to edge back into the match after she had won the first set in commanding fashion.  Probably a symptom of her immaturity, this carelessness would play into the hands of Wozniacki should the Dane stay alert and the match stay close.  In the 2-and-0 demolition that Kvitova inflicted upon her at Wimbledon, the match didn’t last long enough for this issue to surface.  On the other hand, the world #1 has lost six or fewer games in each of her three triumphs over the reigning Wimbledon champion, so one senses that this match may end quickly no matter the outcome.

Zvonareva (1-1) vs. Radwanska (0-1):  Most likely a must-win encounter for both combatants, this meeting represents their fifth clash of the season.  After Zvonareva prevailed comfortably in Miami, the Pole prevailed just as comfortably in their three second-half meetings, including finals in San Diego and Tokyo.  Most stunning from her performance there was her impenetrability on serve, hardly a trait that one associates with her; only once in the two matches combined did she lose her serve.  A more familiar Radwanska traded break for break with Wozniacki in a three-setter on Tuesday that remains the best match of the tournament so far.  Although she frustrated her friend much more than in their past several meetings, the inability to hold serve when absolutely necessary ultimately cost the eighth seed a winnable match and will continue to hamper her upward mobility. All the same, her cavernous bag of tricks might fluster the inflammable Russian more than the placid Dane.  By the end of her last few matches, Zvonareva looked hopelessly bewildered as she committed routine errors and lost her normally acute tactical sense.

As she outmaneuvered Wozniacki from the baseline yesterday, the Russian’s versatility and tactical sense shone much more clearly than in her tepid loss to Kvitova that preceded it.  Despite her natural tendency towards counterpunching, she rose valiantly to the occasion when her opponent forced her to take the initiative and redirected the ball down both lines with conviction while approaching the net with success.  Even more notably, Zvonareva did not grow discouraged by her mistakes as did the Dane, nor did she celebrate her winners with much vigor.  That inner poise will serve her well as she aims to conquer a recent but repeated nemesis.  By no means did the world #6 play an immaculate match, though, and a few of her nine double faults threw Wozniacki fleeting lifelines late in the second and third sets.  Radwanska’s season probably ends here if she fails to sustain the momentum in her rivalry, but Zvonareva probably faces a similar prospect.  Whereas Azarenka and Li have everything to gain with a win, these two women have everything to lose with a loss.  Who will handle that situation more smoothly?

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